Coconut Flour Flaxseed Bread

1/2 cup coconut flour, sifted 1/2 cup flax seeds, ground
1/2 teaspoon salt (or less)
1 teaspoon baking soda
5 eggs
1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
1/8 cup water (or coconut milk for a moister bread)
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar (or coconut water vinegar or lemon juice)

Preheat oven to 325F. Grease a small loaf pan (7 3/4″ × 4 1/2″ × 3″ H). Mix all the dry ingredients together. Combine all the wet ingredients. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and beat well. Batter will be thick. Pour into loaf pan and bake for 40 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool completely before slicing.

Source: http://paleofood.com/recipes/baked-cocoflaxbread.htm

Dinner roll variation: Make this recipe into herb dinner rolls by adding a teaspoon each of chopped fresh thyme, sage, and rosemary to the dough. Shape the dough into rolls and bake 30-40 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. The rolls can be used to make breadcrumbs.

Wow, sorry about the radio silence! We moved house here and things are a bit out of sorts still.

I love how adaptable this recipe is. I have shaped it into patties and used it as burger buns. I have made it into muffins, and you can make it into breadcrumbs. It is tasty, predictable, and travels well. I also like it because unlike many coconut bread recipes, it is both savory and has relatively few eggs.

Finding a gluten-free flour that is low oxalate AND tasty can be challenging. Like most gluten-free baking, this recipe combines two types of grain-like things. I still eat wheat, but this bread makes for a nice backup if I’ve overdone it. And I like that it has a nutty flavor and does not taste like coconut, even though coconut oil is one of the ingredients.

Coconut flour can be very temperamental. Some people keep it in the freezer to avoid effects from humidity. One tip to always remember: Be very, very careful with the measurements. Make sure to level off your measuring cup. Coconut flour is very thirsty, and too little liquid can result in a drier product than you might like. Also, be sure to not have too much of the final product; coconut flour is extremely rich in fiber, with [x] per serving. Remember, what irritates your colon is likely to irritate your bladder.

I want to experiment with making crackers out of this recipe by making the bread, slicing it up very thin, and putting it in the food dehydrator. What things do you want to make with coconut flour?

Breakfast Yogurt

½ cup plain nonfat yogurt
2-3 tablespoons of water or milk
½ scoop whey protein powder
1 tsp. cinnamon extract
(optional) fruit or nut topping

Makes One Serving

Measure ½ cup yogurt and place it in a bowl. Or save yourself a bit of time and put it in a big enough container to take with you. Pour the half scoop of protein powder over the yogurt; stir thoroughly, making sure to scrape the sides. Add 2-3 tablespoons of milk or water. This addition will thin out the yogurt a bit. Mix the cinnamon extract in.

Add your choice of topping. Enjoy!

As I was fumbling around, wondering how I could still enjoy yogurt while cutting down on the sugar, since sugar is a major bladder irritant, I figured something out. And it wasn’t that Jamie Lee Curtis was right about the magical girl yogurt that makes you poop. A weight lifter/body model friend of mine had enticed me into buying some whey protein. “Aha!” I thought. “If you can make protein powder cookies, why not protein yogurt?”

And thus, breakfast yogurt was born.

Take a bit of yogurt, milk or water, protein powder, and cinnamon extract and fruit, and you’ve added some anti-inflammatory goodness to your day. I like to top mine with toasted oats for crunch, but you could try granola, walnuts, or just say screw it and crush up some cookies.

Frozen fruit, like blueberries, can be added the morning you eat it or the night before—no peeling or chopping necessary!

Chamomile-Poached Tilapia with Roasted Red Peppers

tilapia

2 tilapia fillets
2 bags chamomile tea
2 bay leaves
fresh ginger
salt and white pepper to taste
roasted red peppers (optional)

Boil two cups of water. In a heat-safe container, pour the boiling water over the tea bags. Let the tea steep for five minutes. Press a spoon against the tea bags to get as much tea out as possible. Take approximately two inches of the fresh ginger and slice it thinly. Add the bay leaves to a 12-inch skillet. In the 12-inch skillet, bring the tea and ginger to a boil over high heat. Add fillets. Reduce heat to low and simmer covered 6 minutes or until fish flakes with a fork.
Remove the fillets from the liquid. Salt and pepper to taste; if desired, garnish with the roasted red peppers.

What’s anti-inflammatory, low oxalate, interstitial cystitis friendly, and delicious? I’ll just come out and say it: this recipe. The flavor of the fish is definitely mild, but it is moist and tender. You get the benefits of the fish AND the soothing power of chamomile, along with a hint of ginger.

Best of all, it’s a very quick cooking method, perfect for a midweek dinner. Bon appétit!

Super Salad

1.5 cups of romaine lettuce (or a blend of romaine and arugula)
½ ripe avocado, cut into chunks
1 handful alfalfa sprouts
3-4 ounces turkey or chicken breast, cut into chunks (ideally no salt added)
1 ounce crumbled feta
1 tablespoon sunflower or shelled pumpkin seeds
1 tablespoon raisins
part of a roasted red pepper, cut into strips
2-3 ounces mushrooms
pinch of salt and white pepper (optional)

Prepare the vegetables; make sure everything is in bite-sized pieces, or whatever thickness you like. Take a big soup bowl and arrange the meat, feta, avocado, and mushrooms. Put the lettuce, sprouts, and red pepper on top of the mixture. Sprinkle the raisins and seeds over the salad; toss lightly.

This particular salad came about when I realized a local sandwich shop also made salads to order. I can make about two or three of these at home for the cost of one in the shop. Admittedly, the one in the shop is more convenient.

Now, let’s get into what to use to DRESS the salad. I have had perfectly lovely flavors (and no reactions) to plain old extra virgin olive oil. I also have used Bragg’s liquid amino acids. Both are very low oxalate; be warned, though, some IC patients can’t tolerate the saltiness that is the liquid soybeans. B_olthouse Farms also makes a somewhat fresh yogurt ranch dressing, but the jury is still out on whether that’s a good choice for me. I have also had this salad plain; the red pepper and sprouts gives it a nice moistness all by itself.

I REALLY like that the above ingredients are basically good to go once you rinse and cut a few things—I keep the separate ingredients in the fridge at work and assemble them at lunch time. I bet Mason jars would work a treat, too.

I like to think of salads as a grain-free sandwich. Just as you can doctor up your sandwich anyway, you could substitute any ingredients you want. To make it vegetarian, try using sliced up firm tofu or boil and roast lentils ahead of time (just remember, ½ cup of tofu or lentils is medium oxalate). Cut up cucumbers, grill some onions—whatever! What do you like on your salad?